Working with bleed-through

I had this piece sitting around for a long while, waiting for both time and inspiration to come.  It was an old piece and had seen better days, so there was some repair work to be done before refurbishing it.

before

before

I could have stained it, but it was in our shop and I don’t like to have the odor of stains permeating through our beautiful store.  Plus,  there were so many dings and dents, I decided I was going to paint it with American Paint Company paints.    The next big decision was how I wanted to paint it.   We talked about shizzling it with layers of different colors so the final results would have pops of color peeking through and then perhaps adding some details.   Well, THAT didn’t happen.  Apparently the piece wanted to be something different… so we rolled with it.

When we laid on the first color “Sackcloth”  we could see within a few minutes the piece was going to have bleed-through.   The color coming through was yellowish, almost looked like rust in some spots.     We could have stopped and sealed it with shellac, a sealing primer or polyurethane, but I kind of liked the character of the tannins showing through and it changed the design I had in my head, which was good.  I needed to break out of my comfort zone and go for something other than red or black.

American Paint Company's "Sack Cloth"

American Paint Company’s “Sack Cloth”

 

your tannins are showing

your tannins are showing

 

This is NOT a color we chose - it's bleed-through.  I actually like it

This is NOT a color we chose – it’s bleed-through. I actually like it

So you can see the more the piece dried, the stronger the yellow/rust bleed-through showed.   A lot of older furniture will have this issue and you can test the piece to see if you will have to deal with it before you paint by using a spray bottle of water or a paint brush to brush water onto the piece and then laying a paper towel or sprinkling baking soda over the damp furniture – any bleed-through will become apparent as the paper towel/baking soda soaks up the water.   Then you can decide if you want to seal it before painting.

Using Amber Waves of Grain and Smoke Signal, a design began to take shape

Using Amber Waves of Grain and Smoke Signal, a design began to take shape

The first step in what I had in mind with this newly imagined finish was to create a backdrop for a bee and laurel design.    Once the paint was dry, it was time to get out the sandpaper and go to work.

heavy distressing gave this piece even more character

heavy distressing gave this piece even more character

We worked with the bleed through

We worked with the bleed through

The final step was to wax it with American Paint Company’s clear wax, then mix Plymouth Rock with the clear wax and push it into the crevices and details.

Plymouth Rock mixed with clear wax created a great white wax effect to highlight the details

Plymouth Rock mixed with clear wax created a great white wax effect to highlight the details

 

Now the piece sits nicely in our shop with a new companion, waiting for someone to take them home 🙂

lovely pairing!

lovely pairing!

Hope this inspires you to “just roll with it!” Come see the piece in person and enjoy the beautiful items we have in our shop.

 

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